Ring Rolls Out End-To-End Encryption For Surveillance Footage

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Ring has gotten negative press coverage recently for accessing customers’ Ring camera footage. Now they’re implementing end-to-end encryption. End-to-end encryption has become known as a far more sound alternative to conventional encryption. This is because conventional back-doored encryption enables the service provider to access your data whether customers like it or not.

End-to-end encryption provides the ability to prevent the service provider and everyone else from reading or using customers’ data. The emphasis on ability is key here, because end-to-end encrypted services can have trackers built in which log keystrokes on the users’ devices or intercept data in-app before it is encrypted and sent off to the server. This issue pertains mostly to closed-source software because you can’t see if the software is intercepting your data or not.

You should also consider the fact that Ring’s new end-to-end encryption feature is opt-in. If a feature is opt-in, then the provider/manufacturer doesn’t really want you to use it. Customers will have to decide whether they can trust Ring to avoid the use of such trackers. If not, i’d recommend looking into cameras that use HomeKit Secure Video technology, or other open source services offering end-to-end encrypted surveillance cameras.