Jaguar Electric Car Drives From London To Brussels On 1 Charge

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Jaguar I-PACE electric car/SUV
Jaguar I-PACE electric SUV. Image obtained with thanks from Jaguar.

Jaguar drove the I-PACE electric SUV from London to Brussels on a single charge with some range to spare. It was a 229-mile (369 km) trip, part of which was through the Channel tunnel. Electric vehicles have long been criticized for their lack of range. However, it is now common for them to exceed 200 miles per charge easily. Factor in the ability to charge overnight in the comfort of your own home, and electric vehicles start sounding not only practical, but convenient.

The Jaguar I-PACE has a range of 292 miles per charge (on the WLTP cycle), and can accelerate from 0-60 MPH in 4.5 seconds with the help of its 90 kWh battery pack. A 100 kW DC charger can charge the battery from a 0% state-of-charge (SOC) to 80% in 40 minutes, which is reasonable, but not uncommon for electric cars.

Image obtained with thanks from Jaguar.

If you’re interested in learning how the car’s components affect your range, the instrument cluster can tell you how much energy certain devices are using, such as the climate control system. That way you can get a grasp of hypermiling, as some would call it. People have gotten far more than their cars’ advertised range by hypermiling.

Did You Know: A 90 kWh lithium-ion battery pack can power a 10,000 BTU air conditioner for up to 90 hours? Alternatively, it could also power a house (if it consumes an average of 3 kW) for 30 hours! This raises the possibility of re-purposing electric vehicle batteries for solar-powered homes once they have gotten old/lost some of their capacity.

Waking up to a full charge (worth 220+ miles in some electric cars, and 292 miles in this one) every morning is comparable to the half-tank that people often drive around on (a half tank in most sedans is usually ~150 miles) without anxiety. So why do people experience range anxiety on a full charge? EV charging stations are not as abundant as gas stations. However, 220 miles of range far exceeds the (less than) 30 miles that 70% of Americans drive in a day.