The Porsche Mission E electric sports car.
The Porsche Mission E. Image obtained with thanks from Porsche.

Porsche, a German sports car manufacturer is preparing to install 500 electric car charging stations in the United States, according to a report from Auto News. This is a move to back their upcoming electric vehicles, which (wisely) takes a page out of Tesla’s book.

This will be done ahead of releasing the Porsche Mission E, a production electric car slated to go on sale in the U.S. by the end of 2019. Porsche plans to have at least 500 of the fast charging stations rolled out in the U.S. by the end of 2019, and some in Canada by 2020.

The 350 kW, 800 Volt charging stations will be available at Porsche’s 189 dealerships and on some highway stops to ease range anxiety. They won’t necessarily be free of charge, like the Tesla Superchargers. However, it is a step in the right direction that should help motivate Porsche customers to buy electric cars, knowing that they are backed up by those stations.

Speaking of range anxiety, the 600HP (440 kW) Porsche Mission E will offer a range of 300 miles (483 km) per charge, which is a bit more than the Tesla Model S (although EPA range ratings sometimes work out to be less than manufacturers’ ratings). 300 miles equals that of the average gasoline-powered car, which is typically in the 300-400 mile range.

70% of Americans drive fewer than 30 miles per day, which is 1/10th of the range that this car offers. These charging stations will facilitate trips longer than 300 miles (visiting grandma, going on ski trips, and other occasional outings) as they can recharge the cars up to 80% of their capacity (240 miles) in only 20 minutes (which matches the Tesla Superchargers), a far cry from the 10 hours that EV owners used to struggle with.

We may be entering an era in which the decision to purchase a car brand may be influenced by charging stations. If you wanted to buy an electric car, would you choose the Porsche or Tesla which is backed up by hundreds of stations, or would you buy a brand which would leave you to go hunting for more scarce 3rd-party stations?

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